Philippines’ Duterte eases overseas travel ban on health workers

MANILA, Sept 21 (Reuters) – The Philippines’ president has eased an overseas travel ban on Filipino nurses and other medical workers to allow more to take jobs abroad, his spokesman said on Monday, as his government believes it has its coronavirus outbreak under control.

Thousands of health workers, who call themselves “priso-nurses”, had appealed to the government to let them travel, Reuters reported last week. The nurses say they feel underpaid, under-appreciated and unprotected in the Philippines.

President Rodrigo Duterte approved the proposal of the labour ministry to expand exemptions from the ban to those who had overseas contracts and complete documents as of Aug. 31, spokesman Harry Roque told a regular briefing.

So far only those with contracts as of March 8 have been allowed to travel.

Roque said the president’s decision would benefit 1,500 health personnel.

“These are nurses who already spent a lot (of money) processing their

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Pandemic perk: Bay Area companies increase mental health help for remote workers

For those lucky enough to keep their jobs during the pandemic, more than half a year of working from home has tested the nerves of many. An unsettled workforce is placing new focus on the need for companies to provide expanded mental health resources to employees.

According to a recent report, more than 40% of adults in the U.S. are dealing with depression, anxiety and even substance abuse linked to the coronavirus pandemic. A recent survey by Johns Hopkins University found the percentage of adults in the U.S. who reported symptoms of psychological distress jumped threefold from 2018 to April of this year.

To combat the negative mental effects of the pandemic, more companies, particularly in tech, are realizing that mental health support beyond clinical offerings in standard benefit packages is increasingly indispensable instead of nice-to-have perks.

Mental health care is becoming a “fourth pillar” for employee benefits, alongside medical,

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Insurance scheme for health workers fighting COVID extended for 6 month



a person playing a video game: This picture has been used for representtational purpose only


© Provided by Mid-Day
This picture has been used for representtational purpose only

The central government on Tuesday extended the Pradhan Mantri Garib Kalyan package insurance scheme for health workers fighting COVID-19 for another 180 days. It was announced on March 30 for a period of 90 days and was extended further for 90 days.

This Central Sector Scheme provides an insurance cover of Rs 50 lakh to health care providers, including community health workers, who may have to be in direct contact and care of COVID-19 patients and therefore at risk of being infected. It also includes accidental loss of life on account of contracting COVID-19.

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Dentists reopen with full slate of patients, fewer workers

Dawley said many of her patients presented with problems related to lack of preventive care.

“My gum disease patients, especially the ones due for treatment, got caught in bad timing,” she said. “I see them three times a year to control the disease. A lot of them are much worse.”

Gingrich said several patients who had minor dental problems before the March shutdown needed root canals or extractions.

“I was very surprised how many patients that I hadn’t seen in a while come in,” she said. “Some said they wanted to get in just in case (the state) shut us down again. I was like, ‘Really? OK. Well, I guess that’s a good a reason as I need to bring you in the door.'”

Daood said North American clinics are also picking up many new patients, and hired seven additional hygienists.

“We strictly adhere to our social distancing rules and

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Mask shortage still exists for health care workers

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COVID-19 widespread testing is crucial to fighting the pandemic, but is there enough testing? The answer is in the positivity rates.

USA TODAY

FRESNO, Calif. – Rachel Spray is still grieving the loss of her fellow nurse who died after being exposed to the novel coronavirus at Kaiser Permanente Fresno Medical Center in California. Now, as she stands in front of the gleaming glass and concrete hospital, she says she “dreads going in there” and fears she’ll be next.

That’s because like those in many U.S. hospitals, management is rationing supplies, she says, keeping medical-grade masks under lock and key.

White House officials say U.S. hospitals have all the medical supplies needed to battle the deadly virus, but front-line health care workers, hospital officials and even the Food and Drug Administration say shortages persist. Critical shortfalls of medical N95 respirators, commonly referred to as N95 masks, and other protective

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Personal support workers are the backbone of health care but the bottom of the power structure



a close up of a sign: Personal support workers are in high demand - as this sign from Markham, ON indicates. They are an integral part of the healthcare system, but are racialized and underpaid.


© THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Personal support workers are in high demand – as this sign from Markham, ON indicates. They are an integral part of the healthcare system, but are racialized and underpaid.

The COVID-19 crisis has highlighted the significant contribution personal support workers (PSWs) make to Canada’s health-care system. As the backbone of much of the daily health work, they assist people with disability, health and age-related needs in diverse health-care sectors and in people’s homes. It seems like every second, someone requires a PSW for their care.

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When I was a student, I worked as a home care worker for the Red Cross. I was often the only social contact my clients received for an entire month. My personal and professional experiences as a racialized, immigrant woman fuel my academic research.

For my research, I used a method called photovoice in which participants use cameras

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Draft vaccine rationing plans puts health care workers, first responders, first

U.S. health officials released a draft plan for rationing the first doses of coronavirus vaccine once available, prioritizing high risk health care workers and first responders in the first wave, as a third drug company’s candidate advanced to final testing.

AstraZeneca announced its vaccine candidate has entered the final testing stage in the U.S. The Cambridge, England-based company said the study will involve up to 30,000 adults from various racial, ethnic and geographic groups.

Two other vaccine candidates began final testing this summer in tens of thousands of people in the U.S. One was created by the National Institutes of Health and manufactured by Moderna Inc., and the other developed by Pfizer Inc. and Germany’s BioNTech.

“To have just one vaccine enter the final stage of trials eight months after discovering a virus would be a remarkable achievement; to have three at that point with more on the way is

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At Doctors Hospital, COVID-19 health care workers get a dose of ‘puppy therapy’

Emily Wunderlich
 |  Sarasota Herald-Tribune

It was six months ago when Florida’s first COVID-19 patient was admitted to Doctors Hospital of Sarasota.

Janell Albers, a nurse at the hospital’s intensive care unit, had just returned to work from maternity leave.

“For me, it was a whole new meaning of scary because you have the unknown, and then I have a baby at home, and I also have a toddler,” she said.

Now, as the number of COVID-19 cases across the state begin to slow down, so have virus-related hospitalizations at Doctors Hospital. A unit that once occupied four halls on the fifth floor of the hospital now only takes up less than one.

“We’re kind of getting used to it,” said ICU nurse Whitney Olund. “(Coronavirus) is kind of like an everyday thing, like any other thing that we deal with.”

On Tuesday, Albers and Olund were among other health

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No matter the storm, or pandemic, health care workers fight as 1

For months, health care workers have been helping patients and each other as the nation battles COVID-19.

No matter the storm, health care workers fight as one

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Some have traveled across the country to other cities and towns to assist those in need. It was the same story 15 years ago when Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans.

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PHOTOS: Hurricane Katrina made landfall near New Orleans Aug. 29, 2005

Some of those heroes live in Houston.

Amanda Bergeron had grown up in New Orleans. She had just finished nursing school and was working at Tulane Hospital in New Orleans in 2005.

Ahead of the hurricane, Bergeron packed a bag and headed to work at the hospital.

“Growing up in New Orleans, we’re used to evacuating for hurricanes, and it’s not something completely out of the ordinary but something did feel different this time,” she

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COVID-19 infection rate in Louisville health workers up, research says

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The collaboration in Louisville working to battle the coronavirus,the Co-Immunity Project, reported last week that a recent round of tests on health care workers saw a significant increase in infections — about three times higher than an initial round. 

Researchers looked for rates of positive virus cases and antibodies, which can show how many doctors, nurses and other front-line workers had previous exposure. They found the big increase mirrored a boost in positive virus cases seen in the general population during July, when compared with May.

The effort, a collaboration between University of Louisville researchers and the city’s three main health systems, has set out to document COVID-19 prevalence rates in Jefferson County, identify promising treatments and eventually build a blood plasma bank to help patients fight off the virus.

In its first rounds, the Co-Immunity Project has focused on both health care workers who have had high

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