How to safely go to the dentist during the pandemic

My tongue first detected the problem when it caught a sharp edge on my teeth: A hefty hunk of my back right molar was missing. I’m not sure how it happened, but it meant that after months of avoiding any sort of physical closeness with other people, I needed to brave the dentist’s chair.

With the pandemic raging across the United States, the office I entered in Alexandria, Virginia, looked very different from the one I had visited months before. Two cups of pens sat on the receptionist’s desk, one for “clean” writing utensils and the other for those recently used. A plexiglass partition divided me from the rest of the office behind, and everyone—myself included—donned a mask.

Dental work is a uniquely risky environment for spreading SARS-CoV-2, since medical practitioners work face-to-face with open-mouthed patients for extended periods of time. “We, unfortunately, work in a danger zone,” says

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Brussels Report: Governments’ Concerns Rise About Pandemic Cyberattacks on Health Care

A surge in cyberattacks on medical facilities during the pandemic has alarmed national governments. The potential consequences were highlighted last week with the death of a woman after she was turned away from a German hospital that had been struck by ransomware.

“There is growing recognition that we need stronger protections… If coronavirus testing has to stop because computers freeze or are under ransomware or [denial-of-service cyberattacks] and can’t function properly for days or weeks, that can have serious repercussions for patients,” said Kubo Macak, a legal adviser at the International Committee of the Red Cross.

Medical institutions faced an onslaught of hacking attempts as the coronavirus spread this year, ranging from ransomware attacks on hospitals to espionage campaigns targeting pharmaceutical companies developing vaccines. Ransomware crippled servers at University Hospital Düsseldorf this month, prompting the hospital to send emergency patients to other facilities. One woman died during the delay in

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COVID-19 Pandemic Highlights Need for Maintaining Good All-Around Health, including Oral Health, says Dr. Sahar Verdi

Dr. Sahar Verdi of Dental Specialists of California comments on a recent article that maintaining one’s oral health also benefits total-body health, which presents the best defense against COVID-19.

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. (PRWEB) September 24, 2020

An August 14 article in the Coronado Times reports on the increased importance of maintaining oral health during the COVID-19 pandemic. The article discusses how interconnected every system in the body is and the significant impact one system can have on all of the others. While there’s no known direct link between oral health and COVID-19, the article notes that those with all types of health issues may be more vulnerable to developing COVID-19 complications. The article notes that, as teeth and gums can present an early indicator of sickness in other parts of the body, and vice versa, prioritizing dental and medical care when issues arise may also limit the chances of becoming

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Bay Area fitness community moves from yoga studios to paddleboards in the pandemic

It’s 6 a.m. on a recent Saturday. The Sausalito waterfront sky is dim. Steve Hayward, Seatrek’s Fitness Program Manager, is here early to check the air quality monitor on the porch outside his office. If the Air Quality Index (AQI) is 140 and rising toward the red zone, he starts sending texts and emails, cancelling upcoming paddleboarding and kayaking reservations.

Leigh Claxton, who shares the dock and teaches classes for Seatrek, is one of the folks waiting to hear from Hayward. Poor air quality is the latest significant issue Claxton has navigated this year. Her unusual-sounding business, however, is managing just fine.

That business, under the Seatrek umbrella, is called OnBoardSUP, which brings yoga out of the studio and onto paddleboards. (SUP stands for stand-up paddleboarding.) It’s an idyllic-sounding combination — if you’re coordinated, anyway — and was among the first fitness classes in the area to re-open after the

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I’m a dentist. Even in this pandemic, oral health care is essential, especially for children.



Dental instruments on a tray. So far there have been zero transmissions of Coronavirus between dental offices and patients in San Diego County. ( Omar Bárcena)


© ( Omar Bárcena)
Dental instruments on a tray. So far there have been zero transmissions of Coronavirus between dental offices and patients in San Diego County. ( Omar Bárcena)

I am a parent and dentist whose personal and professional life has been upended by this pandemic. If you’re reading this, and haven’t gone through similar turmoil, I would like to meet you. While most of the country is trying to get a grip on what to do about the upcoming school year, those of us in the dental field are dealing with a debate of our own.

Last month, the World Health Organization (WHO) released interim guidance advising routine, non-essential oral health care be postponed because of the coronavirus and transmission risks. Less than two weeks later, the American Dental Association (ADA) released a statement saying that it “respectfully yet strongly disagrees.” The inconsistent recommendations are adding confusion in

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Pandemic perk: Bay Area companies increase mental health help for remote workers

For those lucky enough to keep their jobs during the pandemic, more than half a year of working from home has tested the nerves of many. An unsettled workforce is placing new focus on the need for companies to provide expanded mental health resources to employees.

According to a recent report, more than 40% of adults in the U.S. are dealing with depression, anxiety and even substance abuse linked to the coronavirus pandemic. A recent survey by Johns Hopkins University found the percentage of adults in the U.S. who reported symptoms of psychological distress jumped threefold from 2018 to April of this year.

To combat the negative mental effects of the pandemic, more companies, particularly in tech, are realizing that mental health support beyond clinical offerings in standard benefit packages is increasingly indispensable instead of nice-to-have perks.

Mental health care is becoming a “fourth pillar” for employee benefits, alongside medical,

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The pandemic food fascination that won’t go away

Pictures of sourdough bread seem like a healthy denial of helplessness. <span class="copyright">(Stephen Osman / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Pictures of sourdough bread seem like a healthy denial of helplessness. (Stephen Osman / Los Angeles Times)

I am not someone who cares about food. But since the COVID-19 pandemic began, I have become transfixed by Instagram accounts about food, by recipes, by cooking impresarios.

One of the strangest elements of this crisis has been how hard it is to grasp how dire it is. Despair flickers in and out. Sometimes “safer at home” can feel like a cozy sleepover with your family during which you are wearing sweatpants and watching movies, and sometimes the world, which it turns out you actually liked, is coming to an end. There was a moment, early on, when a friend said to me: Can life as we know it be over if you can still get that special crumbly goat cheese you like from FreshDirect?

I think somewhere deep in my mind is

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Reuters to host Twitter chat on managing mental health in a pandemic

Today, Reuters will host a Twitter chat to discuss strategies to help protect mental health during the coronavirus pandemic, featuring mental health experts from the American Psychiatric Association, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, University of Michigan School of Public Health, University of Michigan Medicine, John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Interdisciplinary Center for Health Workplaces and more. Guests will include:

A healthcare worker sits on a bench near Central Park in the Manhattan borough of New York City, U.S., March 30, 2020. REUTERS/Jeenah Moon TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY – RC2NUF9VY5KU

-Dr. Howard Liu, chair of University of Nebraska Media Center Department of Psychiatry

-Arianna Huffington, founder of Huffington Post and CEO of Thrive Global

-Shekhar Saxena, professor of the practice of global mental health at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

-Karestan Koenen, professor of psychiatric epidemiology at Harvard T.H. Chan School

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Dentists see increase in broken teeth, dental emergencies during COVID-19 pandemic

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) — Dentists across the U.S. are treating more dental emergencies since the COVID-19 pandemic began than they have at any other point in their careers.

“I don’t think either of us has ever seen anything like this,” said Dr. Galen Wagnild, who practices dentistry with his wife, Dr. Kathy Mueller, in San Francisco. Both doctors are prosthodontists and are accustomed to dealing with complicated dental procedures.

“Our patients that we’re seeing have very unusual fractures,” said Dr. Mueller, pointing to a photo of an otherwise completely healthy tooth, split in half. “It’s tremendous force to cause that kind of fracture of your own teeth.”

Dr. Wagnild’s patient Tom Goldman said he started waking up with mouth and tongue pain several months ago.

“I’m usually a pretty calm person, but I think that changed with the pandemic,” he said. “I’m also a veteran. I have found that during

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Fargo exercise equipment company flourishes amid pandemic gym shutdowns

Fargo-based PRx is quickly developing a reputation across America for its wall-mounted, space-saving weight racks.

“It folds up out of the way when not in use,” said PRx Vice President Rachel Rice, “and you can still get your car in the garage when you need to.”

When COVID-19 hit and gyms nationwide shutdown, “it was bananas,” said PRx warehouse worker Ben Gurney. “We tried to adjust right away, but most of us weren’t sure it would continue the way it did.”

When the pandemic began to take hold in the United States, PRx was getting so many orders that it had to limit the hours during the day when orders could be placed. Even then, orders more than exceeded expectations.

“We had the website open 30 seconds before we met our daily sales quota,” Rice said.

The orders piled up. On a normal day before the coronavirus hit, they were

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