COVID19

FitnessAI Unveils Home Workout Features to Meet COVID-19 Fitness Needs


FitnessAI





Tuesday, May 5, 2020 9:30 AM

NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / May 5, 2020 / Today, FitnessAI, the app that uses AI to generate personalized workout plans, has officially rolled out several new features to meet the swelling market demand for at-home fitness applications and equipment during the COVID-19 quarantine.

“FitnessAI is traditionally a strength training app meant for the gym,” details FitnessAI Founder, Jake Mor. “Since gyms are closed, we decided to shift our attention to home workout plans that require absolutely no equipment. Specifically, we’re focusing on two cardio offerings: Home Workouts and The Daily Class.”

FitnessAI is known for its emphasis on strength training, which tailors workouts for users based on their goals. Mor’s algorithm optimizes sets, weights, and reps for optimal muscle growth based on a dataset of more than 6 million workouts from his previous app, Lift Log.

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Czech hospital hit by cyberattack while in the midst of a COVID-19 outbreak

brno-hospital.jpg

Image via Google Street View

The Brno University Hospital in the city of Brno, Czech Republic, has been hit by a cyberattack right in the middle of a COVID-19 outbreak that is picking up steam in the small central European country.

Hospital officials have not revealed the nature of the security breach; however, the incident was deemed severe enough to postpone urgent surgical interventions, and re-route new acute patients to nearby St. Anne’s University Hospital, local media reported.

The hospital was forced to shut down its entire IT network during the incident, and two of the hospital’s other branches, the Children’s Hospital and the Maternity Hospital, were also impacted.

The infection took root at around 5 a.m. in the morning, local time, Peter Gramantik, a patient in the hospital at the time, and a security researcher with Sucuri told ZDNet via email today.

“The hospital public announcement system started to

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Local dentist researches technology to help make office visits safer in time of COVID-19

CHICAGO — Oral health can be a concern for people who are sheltering at home.

Dentistry is defined by close contact with patients, and distancing in the era of COVID-19 poses new challenges.

From the air down to the water, a local doctor is bringing high tech infection control to his neighborhood office.

When news of the virus shutting down China made its way to the U.S, Dr. Michael Czarkowski sunk his teeth deep into research.

“We’ve got to come up with a plan and I’m a pro-active person so I tried to figure out what do I have to do in my practice to protect my patients, my team and my family,” he said.

The dentist who typically sees 80 to 100 patients a week now sees about five for emergency procedures only.

And with worries about COVID-19, the phone isn’t exactly ringing off the hook.

“I can just

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Temporal dynamics in viral shedding and transmissibility of COVID-19

SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19, spreads efficiently, with a basic reproductive number of 2.2 to 2.5 determined in Wuhan1,2. The effectiveness of control measures depends on several key epidemiological parameters (Fig. 1a), including the serial interval (duration between symptom onsets of successive cases in a transmission chain) and the incubation period (time between infection and onset of symptoms). Variation between individuals and transmission chains is summarized by the incubation period distribution and the serial interval distribution, respectively. If the observed mean serial interval is shorter than the observed mean incubation period, this indicates that a significant portion of transmission may have occurred before infected persons have developed symptoms. Significant presymptomatic transmission would probably reduce the effectiveness of control measures that are initiated by symptom onset, such as isolation, contact tracing and enhanced hygiene or use of face masks for symptomatic persons.

Fig. 1: Transmission of infectious diseases.
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Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Update

The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading from person-to-person. Someone who is actively sick with COVID-19 can spread the illness to others. That is why CDC recommends that these patients be isolated either in the hospital or at home (if they are clinically stable) until they are better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others.

How long someone is actively sick can vary, so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made on a case-by-case basis in consultation with doctors, infection prevention and control experts, and public health officials and involves considering specifics of each situation, including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and results of laboratory testing for that patient.

Current CDC guidance for when it is OK to release someone from isolation is made on a case by case basis and includes, at a minimum, meeting all of the following requirements:

  • The patient
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Hong Kong admits 2 new COVID-19 patients, including man who went to the dentist and barber after showing symptoms

Hong Kong recorded two new COVID-19 infections today, including one guy who apparently went to the dentist and the barber after he began showing symptoms.

Dr Chuang Shuk-kwan of the Center for Health Protection said both of the new coronavirus cases are categorized as imported infections, as both patients had recently been abroad.

Case 1035, a 27-year-old man, traveled to Switzerland and France before returning to Hong Kong on April 21. He gave a deep throat saliva sample at AsiaWorld-Expo but was allowed to go back to his home in Sheung Wan until the results came back. After testing positive, the patient told doctors that he had a cough on March 16 and lost his senses of smell and taste on March 20. However, Chuang said the patient did not consult a doctor prior to his return as his symptoms subsided shortly afterwards. The man’s wife, who did not travel

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COVID-19

As of April 17, 2020, there are a total of 28,963 positive cases
and 1,072 deaths
in California
. 

Racial Demographics – A More Complete Picture
As of April 17, data on race and ethnicity is complete for 67 percent of COVID-19 cases and 90 percent of deaths reported to the California Department of Public Health. As testing expands and our work to get more complete information by race and ethnicity advances, the distribution by race and ethnicity for cases may change. As information on race and ethnicity is becoming more complete on reported deaths, our data shows that African Americans/Blacks represent a disproportionately higher number of deaths compared to their representation in California’s population. Another group of heightened concern are Native Hawaiians or Pacific Islanders, although the number of deaths in this population are small and therefore limits statistical comparison.

Twenty-two public health labs in California are testing samples … Read More

COVID-19 Arkansas Department of Health

COVID-19

  

Please take steps to protect yourself. The ADH recommends:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use hand sanitizer when soap and water are not available.
  • Practice social distancing. Avoid close contact with others, especially those who are sick, by keeping at least 6 feet between you and others.
  • Avoid going out except to get medical care. If you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever, cough, or shortness of breath, call your health care provider. Your physician will decide if testing is necessary based on your symptoms and known exposures.
  • Wear a cloth mask when in public and unable to maintain a 6-foot distance from others. Click here to read the CDC’s recommendations. The ADH offers this do-it-yourself cloth mask design.
Updated as of 4/19/2020, 10:47 a.m.
*these data are updated once a day
Confirmed Cases of COVID-19
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UW Medicine looking for plasma donations from patients recovered from COVID-19

Updated


For more coverage, visit our complete 

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