Top moments from Trump, Biden first debate

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Who won the presidential debate is in the eye of the beholder as Trump and Biden argue, giving little of substance to voters and both claiming victory.

USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — The night voters across the country were waiting for finally arrived: President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden went head to head in their first debate of the general election. 

It was an opportunity for each to appeal to undecided voters and solidify their bases by explaining their policies and visions for the country, but the majority of the time on stage was spent trying to get their points across amid frequent interjections and back-and-forth exchanges.

They bickered over their views on who should appoint the next Supreme Court justice, their stances on health care and even brought each other’s families into the fray. Moderator Chris Wallace of Fox News struggled to rein in the candidates

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Brussels Report: Governments’ Concerns Rise About Pandemic Cyberattacks on Health Care

A surge in cyberattacks on medical facilities during the pandemic has alarmed national governments. The potential consequences were highlighted last week with the death of a woman after she was turned away from a German hospital that had been struck by ransomware.

“There is growing recognition that we need stronger protections… If coronavirus testing has to stop because computers freeze or are under ransomware or [denial-of-service cyberattacks] and can’t function properly for days or weeks, that can have serious repercussions for patients,” said Kubo Macak, a legal adviser at the International Committee of the Red Cross.

Medical institutions faced an onslaught of hacking attempts as the coronavirus spread this year, ranging from ransomware attacks on hospitals to espionage campaigns targeting pharmaceutical companies developing vaccines. Ransomware crippled servers at University Hospital Düsseldorf this month, prompting the hospital to send emergency patients to other facilities. One woman died during the delay in

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Trump promotes health care ‘vision’ but gaps remain


CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — More than three-and-a-half years into his presidency and 40 days from an election, President Donald Trump on Thursday launched what aides termed a “vision” for health care heavy on unfulfilled aspirations.

“This is affirmed, signed, and done, so we can put that to rest,” Trump said. He signed an executive order on a range

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Checking your Insulin: Why it’s Important

As of 2019, it’s estimated that 415 million people have diabetes, which is just about 6% of the world’s population. While that doesn’t sound like a large number of people, that’s about 1 person in 11 that has diabetes. With the high price associated with living with the disease despite the importance of insulin testing, it’s no surprise that low-cost alternatives to big, name-brand insulin test kits are coming into the market.

What Are Insulin Test Kits?

Insulin test kits are the way people living with diabetes are able to monitor their blood sugar regularly and either eat more sugar or take a dose of insulin, depending on what the situation calls for. Both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics benefit from using insulin test kits. They are able to read a person’s blood sugar level, which is important for people living with diabetes to know. They’re made of both Read More

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Another Supreme Court showdown, without Ginsburg

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The Supreme Court will take a look at another challenge of the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, in the fall.

USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – The death of Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg could have a major impact on the latest challenge to the Affordable Care Act, which will arrive at the Supreme Court one week after Election Day.

The latest effort by Texas and 17 allied states to strike down the 10-year-old law was considered a long shot at the court because of Chief Justice John Roberts’ alignment with the four liberal justices in prior challenges.

Without Ginsburg, however, there could be four votes on either side, which would leave a federal appeals court ruling against the law intact. If President Donald Trump and Senate Republicans nominate and confirm a conservative successor to hear the case, that could tip the balance.

A tie? How the Supreme

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Donald Trump’s Health Care Executive Orders Lack Teeth

President Donald Trump, who has long promised a “beautiful” and “phenomenal” health care plan, announced a series of largely meaningless actions on Thursday during a speech in North Carolina that effectively served as a campaign event.

The most tangible proposal Trump unveiled was a vow to send $200 prescription drug discount cards to 33 million Medicare beneficiaries “in the coming weeks.” However, the President said the $6.6 billion outlay needed to fund this program would have to come from savings from his “most favored nations” drug pricing proposal, which he announced on Sept. 13, and which experts say would be close to impossible to implement before the November election.

The Trump Administration recently tried and failed to convince the pharmaceutical industry to fund a similar plan, according to the New York Times. It’s unclear if the version announced Thursday will see a different fate.

Trump also announced two non-binding

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Trump unveils “bogus” health care “plan” that doesn’t actually do anything

Donald Trump
Donald Trump

U.S. President Donald Trump reacts after signing an executive order following his remarks on his healthcare policies on September 24, 2020 in Charlotte, North Carolina. Trump’s trip to North Carolina marks his fifth time in the state within the last 30 days. Brian Blanco/Getty Images

President Donald Trump unveiled his long-anticipated health care “plan” on Thursday, but it was comprised of only two toothless executive orders. Journalists and politicians alike were quick to point out that the pair of orders did not actually compromise a “plan” at all, as they were merely “requests for legislation.”

Trump, who repeatedly failed to repeal the Affordable Care Act despite years of promises, claimed on Thursday that “Obamacare is no longer Obamacare” after Republicans tossed the individual mandate penalty. He made the comment while rolling out his “America First Health Plan,” which The Washington Post noted was not actually a “plan.”

“We’ve

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How Health Care Can Stop Amplifying Racism

These health gaps are not immutable. Concrete changes to public policy, industry practices, and medical education could turn the health-care system into a force for greater equality. Here are five such changes:

First, when states are indifferent to whether their Black and Latino citizens have health coverage, the federal government should step in. According to research published earlier this year, 9 percent of white adults were uninsured in 2018, compared with 14 percent of Black adults and 25 percent of Latino adults. The coronavirus recession is making the coverage gap worse. Already, as many as 12 million Americans have lost insurance sponsored by their employer or a family member’s employer. Black, Latino, and other workers of color have faced especially steep declines in employment.

The Affordable Care Act did reduce disparities in insurance by setting up insurance exchanges

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Health care for detainees needs full investigation

Claims that some women who are being held in detention have undergone reproductive surgical procedures without their prior knowledge or consent have been levied against the Irwin County Detention Center (ICDC) in Ocilla, Ga.

Allegations of insufficient medical care exacerbated by COVID-19, coupled with echoes of possible medical experimentation raised in a whistleblower complaint, must be thoroughly investigated to assure against a repeat of the historic contraceptive coercion and medical experimentation on Black, Latina and Indigenous women, as well as inmates.

Given our mission of striving for excellence in health care for all, the American Medical Women’s Association (AMWA) supports the call initiated by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and congressional leaders for the Department of Homeland Security to launch a full investigation of the concerns raised by a former nurse at the detention center who attested that detainees, referred to a yet-unnamed physician, faced unwarranted gynecologic procedures.

It should be

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After promising to unveil a health care plan, Trump delivers a joke

During his remarks on health care policy yesterday, Donald Trump used the word “plan” 39 times. Indeed, the point of the president’s plan was to ostensibly unveil a new governing blueprint, which the White House has labeled the “America First Health Care Plan.”

The problem, however, is that there’s still no actual plan. What Trump unveiled are two executive orders that literally don’t do anything.

President Donald Trump announced two new health care executive orders Thursday on protecting pre-existing conditions and preventing surprise billing as the president seeks to shore up his support on an issue that remains top of mind to voters amid to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. The actions, however, have minimal impact.

To be sure, preventing surprise billing is a worthwhile goal with bipartisan support, but to address the issue, policymakers will need legislative solutions, not a hollow press release from the White House with no force

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